Sony Vegas VS Adobe Premiere, Which One is Better?

Wondershare Editor By Mar 16,2017 11:25 am

It’s an age old battle, Vegas or Premiere, a comparison that many have made over the last few years, as always when making a comparison, things are always skewed by the writers own views, so it is hard to draw any definitive conclusions. Here we aim to lay out the specifications of each product and discuss their effects on workflow, output and usability to form an opinion beyond the ‘this is the one I like’ argument.

1. Specification Comparison

Utilities and Tools Adobe Premiere Sony Vegas
Auto Save

Changeable Aspect Ratios
Keyframing
Multiple Boards & Sequences
Storyboard Display
Timeline Display
Titles
Full Screen Playback
Audio Effects
Audio Transitions
Correction and Adjustment
Transformation Effects
Video Transitions
Visual Effects

As we can see at first glance the two seem very comparable regarding the basic tools and utilities. The one glaring difference not mention in the basic specs outlined above however is that Sony Vegas is a Windows only product. Premiere has versions for both Mac and Windows, and whilst the dominance of Apple within the creative industries is nowhere near what it once was, a sizable number of people still use the Mac platform, and for them, Vegas isn’t even an option without resorting to emulation, which is a processor intensive operation like video editing is not really a viable solution.

It is also important to consider that the spec-sheet itself doesn’t tell the whole story, with the audio and effect modules more advanced in Premiere, however Vegas has the benefit of being a much easier program to get to grips with for anyone new to the video editing world, and although its abilities are perhaps ultimately not as sophisticated as Premiere, new users often find they get better results with Vegas due to the accessibility of its tools. For the more experienced this is probably not a factor, but it is worth considering for newcomers.

2. Interface and Features Comparison

  • adobe premiereAdobe Premiere Interface
  • sony vegasSony Vegas Interface
  • adobe premiereAdobe Premiere Interface
  • sony vegasSony Vegas Interface
Editing Features Adobe Premiere Sony Vegas
Animation Tools

Audio Transitions
Color Correction
Direct Camcorder Capture
Drag and Drop
DVD Burning
Green Screen (Chroma Keying)
HD Support
Speed Change
Subtitles
Video Transitions

Multi-Cam Support
3D Editing

Visual Effects

Again the spec-sheet suggests it is a close call, and to be brutally honest that is mostly the truth, Premiere does have more ability within the editing department there is no question, there are very few things that Vegas does better (3D manipulation being the standout), but distilled into the bare bones of a list of ‘things’, the differences are not so obvious. The usability factor for Vegas carries on into the editing process too, although it is perhaps inevitable that Premiere’s more complex abilities lead to a more complex interface structure and a steeper learning curve, it is still a truth that Vegas is just easier to get results from at the start.

Underneath the specifications though, Premiere does have plenty going for it, the Mercury Playback Engine that drives the editing suite enables renderless real time playback that saves time and makes for a much smoother workflow for any project, and whilst it will not apply to everyone, the multiple camera abilities are second to none and for those that use them, an invaluable and significant tool for producing professional grade output.

I keep returning to this point, but in a comparison of the two products it is a very important one, whilst ultimately Premiere has more ability within it for producing high quality video, it is the learning curve that is the major difference for new users. This should be a consideration for anyone looking at the two, however the complexity of Premiere is not an insurmountable issue. There are numerous tutorials, both free and commercial, available to get any level of user through the first steps of understanding the processes within Premiere, and of course the same is true of Vegas, although to my mind they would not be as essential an item, whereas with Premiere, the very least that is required is going through Adobe’s own online video education for the software.

3. Workflow

Once that initial barrier is overcome however, I feel that the added functionality, workflow efficiency and compatibility- out of the box Premiere can deal with roughly double the number of media formats- of Adobe’s product makes it a superior product for long term use.

The key here is long term, no one wants to relearn everything every couple of years, switching platforms endlessly searching for the ultimate product, so when making a choice for video editing I would always suggest that prospective users consider not just what they want now, but what they may want in the future. Vegas has the easier entry path, there is absolutely no question, however what if you later want the more sophisticated editing facilities? If you switch then you still have to go through learning Premiere, after learning Vegas. Learning one piece of software is a better choice, so which one will fulfill future needs should be taken into account.

4. Compatibility

There is also the issue of other production requirements. If you are aiming towards motion effects, animation and other composite effects within your work, then consider the platform that will be carried out on as well. Here is where Adobe’s strength shines. The various products they put out work together extremely well, and in the case of video effects, Premiere and After Effects together offers a workflow and output quality that is as good as it gets. Saying either will do the job is not really a satisfactory conclusion for these types of comparison, even if it is actually true. However, there are answers here.

In conclusion, Premiere is the more capable program, both in terms of workflow, output and its ability to integrate with other applications to produce much more advanced output. For anyone looking for more than just an editor, it is the choice to make. Find some instructional material, dive in and have fun.

This is a basic comparison about Adobe Premiere and Sony Vegas, which both are professional video editing software. If you want to learn more about Sony Vegas, please check Sony Vegas Editing. If you want to learn more about Premiere, you should not miss Adobe Premiere Editing Tips .

Recommendation

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tecnogaming
Even when you sound like advertisement for Adobe, you're absolutely right. There is no comparison. Vegas 14 Edit cost 400 dollars and Vegas Pro cost now 600 dollars while Creative Cloud ranges from 10 to 50 dollars a month depending on the country of choice but the software offered is astounding. For a profesional designer, this is almost evident. Creative Cloud offers an entire suite while Sony/Magix is only offering 1 program, with a very high price. Sony/Magix is stuck in the past, they need a suscription model right away.
watkino
Is this really a question? Adobe Premiere CS 2017 hands down. Do you use Photoshop? I do. Do you want the industry standard application for visual effects and compositing? Thank you After Effects! Do you need a studio class suite of audio tools? Thank you Adobe Audition! Do you need management of a complex array of digital assets? Adobe Bridge is the only game in town. You get all of these in Adobe Creative Suite - and make no mistake - you really can't compare Adobe Premiere WITHOUT including the ENTIRE Creative Suite ecosphere. Why? Because CS is integral to the Premiere workflow. The truth is, you shouldn't make "apples to apples" comparisons like this, because Creative Suite has no real competition that I know of. Correct me if I'm wrong.
benwydeven
Have you used both programs? In the first list of comparison features, the only difference is that Vegas doesn't have autosave... but it does. The second chart excludes Video transitions in the Vegas column even though it was included in the previous chart. You also suggested that Vegas doesn't have multi camera editing. I've been using Vegas pro for 10 years and regularly shoot 2-3 camera setups and edit in Vegas. The screengrabs of Vegas versus Premiere appear to be bias as well... the Premiere image shows video in the timeline and Vector graphs being used... but the Vegas timeline is empty and dull. Your comparison appears to be slanted. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/396b979f589738b98a17dc0466b56b29fb93b85be0fe52b3bafdb6d8cbe9b36c.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/05ec544e9d6efb85d229da802e5bc0ef1aef115f63ee244288a45f5318d8433b.png
disqus_krKD2yhcol
Vegas HAS multicam support since several years, check it out: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K2R0YKvfZkY I still use Vegas and I agree with on you on many points. It is really a pity Sony doesn't believe anymore in Vegas. It was and it still is a real good product with a great user interface. It really need a redesign of the code, optimization, broader format support to become a high level product. Now we hope Magix can do this, but I'm skeptical... Years ago Premiere was a terrible product: it crashed all af the time, it didn't support many formats, it was almost unusable. But it didn't disappear from the video editing scenario: Adobe rebuilt it from the ground and now it is far more better.
disqus_bhr2lobLbf
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