Filmora9 Basic Video Tutorial

Master the basics and make amazing videos. Learn Filmora9 with these tutorials.

Ep. 08 Editing Audio with Filmora9

By - Oct 11,2019 11:36 am

This episode of the Filmora9 tutorial covers the audio editing features. You’ll learn how to change audio levels, apply fade-in and fade-out effects, set audio keyframes and use De-Noise tool.

Editing audio from the timeline

Each audio file you add to an audio track can be edited directly from the timeline. Filmora9 lets you cut or trim audio files the same way you would cut or trim a video file. In addition, the software displays the Volume bar across all audio files you place on the timeline.

As you hover across the Volume bar the pointer will change into the grabbing hand icon, so you just have to click on it and drag it up or down to change the file’s audio volume. If you drag the Volume bar downwards you can lower the volume for a few decibels or even mute it, while dragging the bar upwards is going to increase the volume.

Apply Audio Fade Effects

Apply audio Fade in and Fade out effects in Filmora9

The Fade-in and Fade-Out icons are located in the upper corners of each audio file you add to the timeline. The Fade-in icon is always located at the begging of an audio clip, and the Fade-Out icon is always at the end. Click on either of these icons and drag them to the point where you would like the effect to stop.

Using the Filmora9’s Audio Editing tab

Audio Editing Panel in Filmora9

Double click on an audio file to bring up the Audio Editing tab where you can adjust the volume or apply effects with more accuracy. The Fade-In and Fade-Out sliders in the upper left side of the tab allow you to set the duration of the fade-in fade-out effects. Alternatively, you can insert the duration of the fade-in or fade effect directly into the box next to the sliders.

The Pitch slider lets you make sound lower or higher, so the drastic changes of the Pitch value can render an audio file inaudible and unrealistic.

 Filmora9 Customize Equalizer

The Equalizer drop-down menu lets you choose from various music genre presets that range from Classic to Rock’n’Roll. Each of these presets are going to change the frequencies in your audio file to make it sound more like a particular genre of music you selected. Click on the Customize button next to the drop-down menu if you would like to adjust the equalizer values manually. For instance, the first slider in the Customize Equalizer menu lets reduce background noise.

You can also use the Denoise tool to eliminate distracting sounds from an audio clip. After clicking on the Remove Background Noise checkbox, you should use the slider below to specify the intensity of noise removal. Use the Denoise moderately, as opting for the Strong option can significantly alter how your audio sounds.

Using the Keyframes to adjust audio levels

On the left side of the Audio tab, you can control the volume of an audio file. The Volume icon at the top lets you choose the channel from which the audio is coming from. Drag the indicator all the way to the Left if you want all sound to come from that channel or do the opposite if you’d like the sound to come from the right channel.

Filmora9 also lets you control the level of audio with keyframes. A keyframe is simply a marker that lets you set a starting and ending point for a change you want to make to any media asset. For instance, if you want the volume of the audio to increase gradually throughout the clip, you just have to set keyframes and adjust the video’s volume.

 Filmora9 Add Audio Keyframe

The Add Volume Keyframes button is located directly below the Volume slider. Place the playhead at the exact position where you would like the gradual increase of the volume to start and click on the Add Volume Keyframes button. You can use the arrows next to the Add Volume Keyframes button to jump forwards or backward through keyframes.

Once you’ve added the keyframes you should click on the first one to make sure it is selected and drag the volume slider to set the volume level at the starting point Proceed to do the same for all keyframes you added to an audio clip.

Most video files have their own audio, so after you add a video clip to the timeline its audio is going to show up in the audio track. Filmora9 lets you edit the video’s original audio from the Audio tab that can be accessed by double-clicking on a video. Right-click on the video file and select the Detach Audio if you want to edit the video separately from the audio.